Anatomy of Christmas Dinner

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Christmas has been celebrated in the United Kingdom since the beginning of the 19th century. What are the traditional dishes served? We break down the anatomy of Christmas Dinner below.

Anatomy of a Christmas Dinner

The Christmas dinner has its roots from before the Middle Ages, but during the Victorian period is when the dinner we now associate with Christmas began to take place.

Early recipes included mince pies made from meat and there was a revolution of more festive dishes during the 19th century.

A modern yet traditional Christmas dinner is eaten at mid-day or early afternoon and includes:

ROAST TURKEY

Historical Fact: Roast Turkey has its beginnings in Victorian Britain. The turkey was added during the 19th century in wealthy communities.

RICH NUTTY STUFFING

Fact: Stuffing gets its name because it is stuffed into and cooked in another food.

ROAST POTATOES

Historical Fact: Potatoes appeared in Europe in the 1500s.

HOT GRAVY

Fact: The most popular gravy in the UK is onion gravy.

GOOSE

Historical Fact: In the 18th century, goose was more popular than turkey for Christmas dinner because it was tastier and cheaper.

BRUSSEL SPROUTS

Historical Fact: Brussel sprouts origins date back to ancient Rome, however they were widely cultivated in Belgium in the 16th century.

CRANBERRY SAUCE

Fact: If you lay out all of the cranberry sauce consumed in a year from end to end, it would stretch 5.5m.

Christmas dinner also includes dessert:

CHRISTMAS PUDDING,

A TRADITIONALLY BROWN, RICH AND FRUITY PUDDING

Historical Fact: One notable medieval English Christmas dinner featured a giant pie, weighing 75kg.

1 BBC.com. (2014). History of Christmas. Retrieved December 1, 2014 from http://bbc.in/1wZeEef

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Jordhan Briggs is a content writer and copywriter at Enova International, Inc. dedicated to providing the most informative and useful content about living a rewarding life on a budget.

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The information in this article is provided for education and informational purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness or fitness for any particular purpose. The information in this article is not intended to be and does not constitute financial or any other advice. The information in this article is general in nature and is not specific to you the user or anyone else.